Boner of the Day

Boner Fight for June 22nd, 2020

Boner Candidate #1: IT WILL NOT BREAK ME. I WILL NOT BREAK DOWN

A noose was found in the garage stall used by NASCAR’s Bubba Wallace, less than two weeks after the racing body banned the display of the Confederate flag at all its events and properties. Wallace, the only Black driver in the sport’s top level, had called for the flag — a symbol long linked to America’s history of racism — to be prohibited earlier this month as protests over police brutality and systemic inequality raged across the country. But the decision sparked controversy among the sport’s mostly white, Southern fan base who argued the flag isn’t a racist symbol but a part of their heritage. The noose was found in the garage stall for the No. 43 car racing team, which is owned by Richard Petty Motorsports. It’s unclear who has access to the stalls. Nooses are one of the most powerful symbols of hate directed toward Black Americans and tied to the history of lynchings in the South, according to the Anti-Defamation League. “Today’s despicable act of racism and hatred leaves me incredibly saddened and serves as a painful reminder of how much further we have to go as a society and how persistent we must be in the fight against racism,” Wallace said in a statement on Twitter.

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Boner Candidate #2: YOU MAKE TOO MUCH MONEY TO BE DISCRIMINATED AGAINST.

SALT LAKE CITY — On Friday afternoon, thousands gathered in Salt Lake City to celebrate Juneteenth, the date commemorating the emancipation of slaves, while continuing to protest racial injustice. It was a scene that played out in cities across the United States and the globe on June 19. In solidarity of celebrating Juneteenth, Black culture and continuing a conversation about racial equality, Utah Jazz guard Donovan Mitchell posted to Instagram a photo that showed a black background and the word “free-ish” in white font on top of “Since 1865” bookended by chain links. The image, which was widely shared throughout social media on Friday and is often seen on the fronts of T-shirts and hoodies in many variances, references the the Juneteenth emancipation date of 1865 while the ‘ish’ points to the fact that even though legally declared free, Black people have continued to experience inequality and injustice. Both Mitchell and Oklahoma City Thunder guard Chris Paul posted the image to social media on Friday, and Mitchell ‘liked’ Paul’s post of it on Twitter. While most of the fans who saw Mitchell’s post commented with messages of support and love, there was a large number of commenters who responded with hostility and anger.

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