Boner of the Day

Boner Fight for May 27th, 2020

Boner Candidate #1: SOMETIMES SORRY DON’T CUT IT

A white woman has apologized for calling police on a black man in Central Park on Monday, after the two argued about her unleashed dog. Amy Cooper told CNN she wanted to “publicly apologize to everyone.” “I’m not a racist. I did not mean to harm that man in any way,” she said, adding that she also didn’t mean any harm to the African American community. She was walking her dog Monday while Christian Cooper was bird watching at a wooded area of Central Park called the Ramble. Amy Cooper and Christian Cooper are not related. They both told CNN the dispute began because Amy Cooper’s dog was not on a leash. Dogs are supposed to be leashed at all times in the Ramble, according to the park’s website. The dog has been surrendered to the shelter he was adopted from days earlier while the dispute is addressed, according to a Facebook post from Abandoned Angels Cocker Spaniel Rescue, Inc. “The dog is now in our rescue’s care and he is safe and in good health,” the post said.

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Boner Candidate #2: RIGHT. DRAIN THE SWAMP.

A former White House aide won a $3 million federal contract to supply respirator masks to Navajo Nation hospitals in New Mexico and Arizona 11 days after he created a company to sell personal protective equipment in response to the coronavirus pandemic. Zach Fuentes, President Donald Trump’s former deputy chief of staff, secured the deal with the Indian Health Service with limited competitive bidding and no prior federal contracting experience. The IHS told ProPublica it has found that 247,000 of the masks delivered by Fuentes’ company — at a cost of roughly $800,000 — may be unsuitable for medical use. An additional 130,400, worth about $422,000, are not the type specified in the procurement data, the agency said. What’s more, the masks Fuentes agreed to provide — Chinese-made KN95s — have come under intense scrutiny from U.S. regulators amid concerns that they offered inadequate protection. “The IHS Navajo Area Office will determine if these masks will be returned,” the agency said in a statement. The agency said it is verifying Fuentes’ company’s April 8 statement to IHS that all the masks were certified by the Food and Drug Administration, and an FDA spokesperson said the agency cannot verify if the products were certified without the name of the manufacturer.

 


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