Boner of the Day

Boner Fight for June 13th, 2019

Candidate #1: THE FIX IS SIMPLE…JUST SELL HIGHER ALCOHOL BEER.

There may be a slight gap between 3.2 beer being removed from grocery and convenience store shelves and heavier brews being moved in. Speaking on the “Utah Booze News” podcast, Utah Dept. of Alcoholic Beverage Control Executive Director Sal Petilos said the bill lawmakers passed doesn’t allow stores to stock up on heavier brews. “There’s a bit of a technical snag in terms of logistics. The legislature anticipates a flip of the switch. There may be a period of time that some grocery and convenience stores may not have 5.0 beer because technically speaking, they can’t store it nor can they sell it until November 1. There’s that issue out there,” he said. Asked if that means some beer brands won’t be available for consumers immediately once the law changes, Petilos told FOX 13: “That’s what industry tells us.” Kate Bradshaw, who led the Utah Alcohol Coalition, which led the lobbying effort to get heavier beers, said it was trying to find a fix.

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Candidate #3: THE CRIME IS, HE WAS CHARGED WITH A CRIME

When Scott Daniel Warren was arrested last year after allegedly providing food, water, beds and clean clothes to undocumented immigrants near Arizona’s Sonoran Desert, the question was whether he had broken the law or upheld it. “No Más Muertes,” an advocacy group that wants “no more deaths” of people crossing the desert regions linking Mexico and the southwestern United States, sees Warren – one of its most visible members – as an apostle of humanitarianism. His advocates say the geographer, who has taught courses at Arizona State University, was heeding both religious rules and international covenants that require sanctuary for the persecuted and the dispossessed. The government, however, sees Warren, 36, as a felon. Arrested by Border Patrol agents in January 2018 at a property offering aid for immigrants in Ajo, Arizona, he was accused of helping border-crossers evade authorities, which is prohibited under federal law. The activist faced up to 20 years in prison on charges of harboring and conspiring to transport undocumented immigrants. At his trial, which began last month, a federal jury in Tucson was presented with two different versions of the accused. Had he acted on “basic human kindness,” providing only the necessities enabling migrants to survive, as his lawyer contended? Or had he aided and abetted those making a mockery of the nation’s immigration laws? Of the migrants he assisted, “They were not injured,” a federal prosecutor said, according to the Associated Press. “They were not sick. They were not resting and recuperating.” Deciding who Warren is and what he did proved a task too tortuous for jurors, who said on Tuesday they remained deadlocked in their deliberations and could not reach a unanimous verdict.

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