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Boner Fight for March 10th, 2020

BONER CANDIDATE #1: NEVADA VANDALISM SPREE

Driving to an out-of-town wedding can come with all sorts of inconveniences. For two Nevada men, those include federal charges stemming from an alleged vandalism spree while documenting their road trip antics on Instagram. Daniel Plata and Jonathan Pavon, both 25, are accused of damaging government property, including an archaeological site, during a vandalism spree that took them to remote, and culturally significant, sites throughout rural Nevada. According to authorities, the two Elko residents vandalized buildings and rock formations at several locations on Sept. 19, 2019, while en route to a wedding. An eyewitness at White River Narrows, an important cultural site in the Basin and Range National Monument, reported seeing the men painting a rock formation and alerted Nevada Highway Patrol, according to documents. Troopers reported finding more than 100 cans of spray paint and other painting equipment in the trunk of their car. In addition to the vandalism at White River Narrows, they are accused of vandalizing property near the Schelbourne rest stop in White Pine County and in Lund and McGill.   Read More

BONER CANDIDATE #2: JUST GET THOSE VIRUS-RIDDEN CREATURES OUT OF THE COUNTRY

The body representing US immigration judges has recommended that coronavirus advice posters from the Centres for Disease Control be posted in court buildings – only to be ordered by a government office to take them down. The incident comes just a week after an immigration judge retired while claiming the Trump administration was turning the Immigration Courts into a “politburo rubber stamp”, and the government’s immigration policies have been accused of potentially hastening the spread of coronavirus by scaring immigrants into dropping their health insurance. The National Association of Immigration Judges (NAIJ) recommended to judges that they hang warning posters – in both English and Spanish – in public areas of their courts as part of a list of measures to combat the spread of the virus. However, only hours after it tweeted out its official advice, it said the Executive Office for Immigration Review (EOIR), which oversees the immigration courts, had ordered the posters to be taken down.   Read More


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