Boner of the Day

Boner Fight for September 6th, 2019

Boner Candidate #1: WHAT IF THEY ASK ABOUT ORAL SEX? DOES EVERYONE HAVE TO HEAR ABOUT ORAL SEX?

Several conservative groups packed the Utah Board of Education meeting Thursday to protest a state law that says teachers can answer “spontaneous questions” from students about sex. One woman called that allowance “inappropriate and potentially graphic.” Another said it opened the possibility for educators to get into “grossly irresponsible” material — and stray away from discussions on abstinence. Several speakers worried about what might be taught on abortion. “If one child asks about oral sex or something explicit and the teacher answers it, it doesn’t mean the other 30 kids want to hear it,” said Robert Woods, who has four boys in public school. “Why can’t the teacher just say ‘That’s outside our curriculum. Please ask your parents if you really want to know’?” The demonstration was organized by the Utah Eagle Forum and Pro-Life Utah. Members of the two groups signed up for nearly every slot during the public comment period, sent emails to those on the state school board and carried signs that said, “While you were reading this a baby was aborted.” One woman wore an American flag T-shirt. One man shouted “Amen.” Read More

Boner Candidate #2: UTAH CLIMBS RIGHT INTO BED, IN HELL, WITH THE NRA

Ten states and nearly two dozen members of Congress are joining the National Rifle Association in supporting gun-maker Remington Arms as it fights a Connecticut court ruling involving liability for the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting. Officials in the 10 conservative states, 22 House Republicans and the NRA are among groups that filed briefs with the U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday and Wednesday. They urged justices to overturn the Connecticut decision, citing a much-debated 2005 federal law that shields gun-makers from liability, in most cases, when their products are used in crimes. Remington, based in Madison, North Carolina, made the Bushmaster AR-15-style rifle used to kill 20 first graders and six educators at the Newtown, Conn., school on Dec. 14, 2012. A survivor and relatives of nine victims of the massacre filed a wrongful death lawsuit against Remington in 2015, saying the company should have never sold such a dangerous weapon to the public and alleging it targeted younger, at-risk males in marketing and product placement in violent video games. Citing one of the few exemptions in the 2005 federal law, the Connecticut Supreme Court ruled 4-3 in March that Remington could be sued under state law over how it marketed the rifle. The decision overturned a ruling by a state trial court judge who dismissed the lawsuit based on the federal law, named the Protection of Lawful Commerce in Arms Act. Read More


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