Boner of the Day

Boner Fight for June 25th, 2019

Boner Candidate #1: MY FEATHERS WEREN’T BOTHERING ANYBODY.

Most of what Tasheena Savala wore to honor her Navajo heritage was covered by the billowy folds of her graduation gown. Under it, she had on a traditional velvet dress that her grandmother had sewn for her and a turquoise and silver belt of her mom’s. On her neck, she layered tribal necklaces. On her feet, she slid on moccasins.
Each carried meaning, but Savala wanted to wear at least one thing from her culture that people would be able to see when she walked across the stage to get her diploma from Lehi High School. So on top of her cap, alongside her tassel, she attached three brown eagle feathers. When she lined up behind the curtains with the other students on graduation day, she felt good in her regalia. Then, she remembers a teacher barking: “What are those?” And he pointed to her head. “These feathers are sacred,” Savala explained, pulling off her cap to show him the small addition. “They represent honesty, truth, strength and courage.”

Read More

Boner Candidate #2: SPORTS RADIO SHOULD BE MADE ILLEGAL

A lowlife Kansas City radio host invoked the 2012 death of Andy Reid’s son Garrett as part of an overarching criticism of Reid’s approach to personal accountability, in yet another sign that sports radio should be made illegal immediately. Kevin Kietzman is the host of Between The Lines, an afternoon radio show on Sportsradio 810 WHB in Kansas City. The segment in question, Monday afternoon, was on the possible return of Tyreek Hill to the Chiefs. Yahoo Sports reported Monday that Hill could potentially return to the Chiefs by the start of training camp. It is Kietzman’s feeling that the Chiefs are ill-equipped to handle Hill’s return to the NFL, and cited among his evidence that Reid “wasn’t real great” at discipline: The reference here is to Reid’s eldest son Garrett, who died of a heroin overdose in 2012, at Philadelphia Eagles training camp. Kietzman stops short of blaming Reid for Garrett’s death, but implies that the same difficulties with accountability that he’s observed in Reid’s coaching also “did not work out particularly well in his family life.” Needless to say, Garrett’s drug abuse and death are completely irrelevant to any sane conversation about Reid’s coaching ability, and any connection drawn between the two is wildly irresponsible, to put it mildly. The responsibilities Reid carries as the coach of a player accused of child abuse are completely unrelated to his responsibilities as a parent, in particular as a parent to a 29-year-old son dealing with substance abuse problems, a fraught and complex and excruciatingly painful situation for anyone, no matter their disposition or profession.

Read More


Subscribe to X96's News!

Get the latest music news, contests and flyaways, and more straight to your inbox with our weekly emails.

* indicates required
Comments
To Top